Ameliorating the disadvantage for autistic job seekers: An initial evaluation of adapted employment interview questions 2017-2020

Despite possessing valuable skills, social communication differences mean that autistic people are frequently disadvantaged in job interviews. We examined how autistic and non-autistic adults compared on standard (unmodified) job interview questions, then used these findings to develop and evaluate supportive adaptations to questions. Fifty adults (25 autistic, 25 non-autistic) took part in two mock job interviews. Interview 1 provided a baseline measure of performance when answering typical, unmodified interview questions. Employment experts (unaware of participants’ autism diagnoses) rated all interviewees on question-specific performance and overall impressions; then provided feedback about how interviewees could improve, and how questions could be adapted to facilitate this. Interviewees also provided feedback about the interview process, from their perspective. Adaptations to the questions were developed, with Interview 2 taking place approximately six months later, and ratings were again gathered from employers regarding interviewees' performance for each question and their overall impressions of them.

Keywords:
autism, job interviews, communication skills, disadvantaged groups, job seekers, employment, experts, employers, employees, communication impairments

Cite this dataset as:
Maras, K., 2021. Ameliorating the disadvantage for autistic job seekers: An initial evaluation of adapted employment interview questions 2017-2020. UK Data Service. Available from: https://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN-854513.

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Creators

Katie Maras
University of Bath

Contributors

University of Bath
Rights Holder

Coverage

Collection date(s):

From 31 August 2017 to 28 February 2020

Geographical coverage:

South West of England, United Kingdom

Documentation

Data collection method:

Fifty adults (25 autistic, 25 non-autistic) took part in two mock job interviews. Interview 1 provided a baseline measure of performance when answering typical, unmodified interview questions. Employment experts (unaware of participants’ autism diagnoses) rated all interviewees on question-specific performance and overall impressions; then provided feedback about how interviewees could improve, and how questions could be adapted to facilitate this. Interviewees also provided feedback about the interview process, from their perspective. Adaptations to the questions were developed, with Interview 2 taking place approximately six months later.

Funders

Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)
https://doi.org/10.13039/501100000269

ESRC Future Research Leaders - Reporting by People with Autism: A New Evidence Based Supportive Model of Information Gathering for Applied Interviews Contexts
ES/N001095/1

Publication details

Publication date: 14 January 2021
by: UK Data Service

Version: 1

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN-854513

URL for this record: https://researchdata.bath.ac.uk/id/eprint/1033

Related papers and books

Maras, K., Norris, J. E., Nicholson, J., Heasman, B., Remington, A. and Crane, L., 2020. Ameliorating the disadvantage for autistic job seekers: An initial evaluation of adapted employment interview questions. Autism, 25(4), pp.1060-1075. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1177/1362361320981319.

Contact information

Please contact the Research Data Service in the first instance for all matters concerning this item.

Contact person: Katie Maras

Departments:

Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences
Psychology

Research Centres & Institutes
Centre for Applied Autism Research