Dataset for "Spatial periodicities inside the Talbot effect: understanding, control and applications for lithography"

This dataset contains the data used to create the figures within the article "Spatial periodicities inside the Talbot effect: understanding, control and applications for lithography" by Pierre Chausse and Philip Shields.

The data comprises one-dimensional and two-dimensional data showing the spatial variation of the light intensity behind grating masks that are illuminated with collimated 375 nm optical radiation. The grating mask period has been varied from 600 nm to 1200 nm.

Subjects:
Optics, photonics and lasers

Cite this dataset as:
Chausse, P., 2021. Dataset for "Spatial periodicities inside the Talbot effect: understanding, control and applications for lithography". Bath: University of Bath Research Data Archive. Available from: https://doi.org/10.15125/BATH-01046.

Export

[QR code for this page]

Data

dataset.rar
application/x-rar (252MB)
Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0

Data for Figures 1-6

Creators

Pierre Chausse
University of Bath

Contributors

Philip Shields
Supervisor
University of Bath

University of Bath
Rights Holder

Documentation

Data collection method:

A MATLAB computer model was developed to simulate the operation of a DTL machine in which the light source is a 375 nm UV laser. An optical system generates a plane wave illuminating a conventional lithography mask at normal incidence so that the light arriving at the mask is homogeneous, unpolarised, and in phase. The complex electric field is derived using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the electric field of the mask. As periodic masks are mandatory for DTL, periodic boundary conditions can be applied. Contributions from the different mask regions, propagating behind it, are given amplitudes of 1 and 0 for a chrome amplitude mask, and 1 and -1 for a phase mask. The integration of the three-dimensional light known as the Talbot carpet is then performed. The electric field is multiplied by its conjugate to obtain the surface light intensity.

Technical details and requirements:

The simulations were performed within MATLAB.

Additional information:

Within the main .rar file, each figure has its own compressed .rar file. In each of these, the final figure in .jpg is included, along with the source figure or subfigures in both .tif and MATLAB proprietary .fig formats. The underlying data has also been exported in CSV format. In the data folder for figure 1, there are two CSV files: - x.csv corresponds to the x-axis value for each curve; - y.csv contains the values of the different spatial periodicity, where NaN means no value. For all the other figures, each subfigure is accompanied by two or three CSV files: - x.csv is the x-axis points value; - y.csv is the y-axis points value; - Data.csv corresponds to the matrix data, where applicable.

Funders

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)
https://doi.org/10.13039/501100000266

Manufacturing of Nano-Engineered III-N Semiconductors
EP/M015181/1

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)
https://doi.org/10.13039/501100000266

Manufacturing of Nano-Engineered III-N Semiconductors - Equipment
EP/M022862/1

Publication details

Publication date: 16 August 2021
by: University of Bath

Version: 1

DOI: https://doi.org/10.15125/BATH-01046

URL for this record: https://researchdata.bath.ac.uk/id/eprint/1046

Related papers and books

Chausse, P. and Shields, P., 2021. Spatial periodicities inside the Talbot effect: understanding, control and applications for lithography. Optics Express, 29(17), p.27628. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1364/OE.431698.

Contact information

Please contact the Research Data Service in the first instance for all matters concerning this item.

Contact person: Pierre Chausse

Departments:

Faculty of Engineering & Design
Electronic & Electrical Engineering

Research Centres & Institutes
Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology