Dataset on the reproductive health needs of women receiving opioid substitution treatment and the role of community pharmacy

We wanted to understand the support that women receiving opioid substitution treatment (a type of medicine to help people recover from addiction to heroin) need in relation to their reproductive health (which includes pregnancy planning, or family planning support to prevent pregnancy till a time they are ready). Women often see their pharmacist daily or weekly if they are receiving opioid substitution treatment, so we wanted to speak to women and community pharmacists to see if it was acceptable and feasible for pharmacists to offer support with their reproductive health.

This dataset consists of anonymised transcripts of two series of semi-structured interviews conducted between 2016 and 2017 in south-west and south-east England.

The first series was conducted with 20 community pharmacists who supply opioid substitution and provide the supervised administration service. Most interviews were conducted face to face, but a few were conducted by telephone. They were undertaken to understand pharmacists' knowledge of the reproductive health needs of women who are receiving opioid substitution treatment and whether the pharmacists felt able, and were willing to provide, reproductive health support and if so, what that should look like.

The second series was conducted with 40 women of child bearing age (18–49, ethics precluded recruiting younger participants) receiving opioid substitution treatment, recruited through community drug teams in south-west and south-east England. The interviews were conducted face to face. They were undertaken to understand women's reproductive health needs when they are receiving opioid substitution treatment and whether they felt a community pharmacy would be an acceptable place to receive reproductive health support. The transcripts also include demographics such as age, number of previous pregnancies, length of time receiving opioid substitution treatment (OST) and type of OST.

Keywords:
Reproductive Health, Opioid Substitution Treatment, Community Pharmacy, Behaviour Change, TDF, COM-B, Qualitative Interviews
Subjects:
Psychology

Cite this dataset as:
Family, H., Scott, J., Alhusein, N., Neale, J., Chater, A., 2023. Dataset on the reproductive health needs of women receiving opioid substitution treatment and the role of community pharmacy. Bath: University of Bath Research Data Archive. Available from: https://doi.org/10.15125/BATH-01071.

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Creators

Hannah Family
University of Bath; University of Bristol

Jenny Scott
University of Bath

Nour Alhusein
University of Bristol

Joanne Neale
King's College London; University of New South Wales

Angel Chater
University of Bedfordshire

Contributors

University of Bath
Rights Holder

Documentation

Data collection method:

Semi-structured interviews were carried out with (a) 20 community pharmacists (CPs), either face-to-face or by telephone, and (b) face-to-face with 40 women receiving opioid substitution treatment (WRO), aged between 18 and 49 (women of child bearing age). CPs and WRO were purposively recruited to represent a range of views on this topic: - Twenty CPs were recruited to ensure a range of experiences and an even balance of gender, age, ethnicity, pharmacy experience (years), number of OST clients, type of community pharmacy they work in (national chain [multiple pharmacy], medium-small size chain, supermarket and independent pharmacy) and location. - Regarding WRO participants, the inclusion criteria for this study were WRO aged 18–49 and English-speaking; we recruited WRO from different age groups, WRO who take their daily dose whilst under supervision and WRO who collect their OST doses, and according to the type of community pharmacy they attend and location. All interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and anonymised. Interview topic guides for both CPs and WRO were based upon the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF). The TDF has 14 domains and is used to understand behaviours that affect successful development of interventions in order to improve implementation in practice. For this study the TDF framework was used to develop questions for the WRO topic guide, to explore the factors that affect WRO’s contraception use. Other topics included their experiences of contraception advice and provision, use of contraception and of community pharmacy services, whether they would feel a contraception service provided by CPs would be acceptable and if so what it should look like. The TDF framework was used to develop questions for the CP topic guide on the factors which they perceive to be barriers or facilitators to providing a contraception intervention for WRO. CP participants were recruited from community pharmacies in south-west and south-east England. These two locations were chosen as the types of public health service community pharmacies provides can vary by region. This variation can occur because the public health services that community pharmacies provide (including sexual health and contraception services) are commissioned through local authorities and clinical commissioning groups rather than NHS England so that they can respond to the specific public health needs of the local population. The study was reviewed and approved on 24th May 2016 by the Greater Manchester West Research Ethics Committee (REC Reference 16/NW/0376). Health Research Authority approvals to conduct the research in the NHS were given on 2nd August 2016 (IRAS Ref: 20049). Superintendent pharmacists of pharmacy chains, and pharmacy owners or managers of independent pharmacies were contacted to inform them of the study, and request their permission to invite their pharmacists to participate and agreement for pharmacy teams to distribute study invitations to WRO that attend their pharmacy.

Funders

Medical Research Council (MRC)
https://doi.org/10.13039/501100000265

Community pharmacist provision of contraception services for women receiving opiate substitution treatment
MR/N011147/1

Publication details

Publication date: 20 February 2023
by: University of Bath

Version: 1

DOI: https://doi.org/10.15125/BATH-01071

URL for this record: https://researchdata.bath.ac.uk/id/eprint/1071

Related papers and books

Neale, J., Werthern, H., Alhusein, N., Chater, A., Scott, J., and Family, H., 2021. Contraceptive choice and power amongst women receiving opioid replacement therapy: qualitative study. Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, 29(6), 655-666. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1080/09687637.2021.1954599.

Contact information

Please contact the Research Data Service in the first instance for all matters concerning this item.

Contact person: Jenny Scott

Departments:

Life Sciences
Pharmacy & Pharmacology