Dataset for paper entitled "Do emotions benefit investment decisions? Anticipatory emotion and investment decisions in non-professional investors"

This dataset contains behavioural performance and psychophysiological data from four trading games created by Dr Neal Hinvest and Dr Richard Fairchild. The games present participants with the opportunity to invest in a share or keep money in the "bank". The dataset contains data on individuals behaviour while playing the stock market. Measures such as amounts invested insnares and the bank were recorded. Participant performance such as returns made per trial were created. Skin Conductance Response (SCR) was measured while playing the games to measure anticipatory emotion, a covert emotion signal that impacts upon decision-making. Self-reported emotion felt during the tasks was measured via provision of several instances of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS, Watson et al., Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54(6), 1063-1070).

Subjects:
Economics
Management and Business studies
Psychology

Cite this dataset as:
Hinvest, N., Alsharman, M., Roell, M., Fairchild, R., 2021. Dataset for paper entitled "Do emotions benefit investment decisions? Anticipatory emotion and investment decisions in non-professional investors". Bath: University of Bath Research Data Archive. Available from: https://doi.org/10.15125/BATH-00699.

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Data

AE_investment_dataset.csv
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Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0

Dataset for paper "Do emotions benefit investment decisions? Anticipatory emotion and investment decisions in non-professional investors"

Creators

Neal Hinvest
University of Bath

Muhamed Alsharman
University of Bath

Margot Roell
Université Paris Descartes; University of Bath

Contributors

University of Bath
Rights Holder

Documentation

Data collection method:

Participants completed four stock market games where they allocated their (hypothetical) wealth between investing in a share vs. the bank. The bank paid a steady, risk-free, interest while money invested in the share could increase or decrease depending on its behaviour. Anticipatory Skin Conductance Response (aSCR) was measured in a critical time period. Participants also completed the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS). There were 30 participants, recruited in and around the University of Bath, U.K.

Additional information:

The dataset is a .csv file. A codebook is provided as a .txt file

Documentation Files

Hinvest_AE … stment_codebook.docx
application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document (14kB)
Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0

Codebook for paper entitled "Do emotions benefit investment decisions? Anticipatory emotion and investment decisions in non-professional investors."

Funders

Publication details

Publication date: 9 December 2021
by: University of Bath

Version: 1

DOI: https://doi.org/10.15125/BATH-00699

URL for this record: https://researchdata.bath.ac.uk/id/eprint/699

Related papers and books

Hinvest, N. S., Alsharman, M., Roell, M. and Fairchild, R., 2021. Do Emotions Benefit Investment Decisions? Anticipatory Emotion and Investment Decisions in Non-professional Investors. Frontiers in Psychology, 12. Available from: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.705476.

Contact information

Please contact the Research Data Service in the first instance for all matters concerning this item.

Contact person: Neal Hinvest

Departments:

School of Management
Accounting, Finance & Law

Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences
Psychology