Premises of Support and Opposition to NATO Enlargement: A Dataset

In this NVivo 12 textual analysis package files and Stata 17 datasets, the focus is on the arguments presented by 40 leading analysts of European security in their arguments for their view on whether NATO enlargement was a mistake. The selection of the experts was done by the Foreign Affairs journal that published an opinion survey of 62 experts of which 40 published their arguments in addition to their opinions in this survey publication of Foreign Affairs (Foreign Affairs Survey 2022). These arguments by 40 of the 62 surveyed experts is the textual material of this dataset. The textual data was coded to reveal premises of these experts. The coding was based on distinctions that the creator of this dataset created on the basis of literature reviewed in his article “Theoretical Premises of Support of and Opposition to NATO Enlargement.”

Keywords:
NATO Enlargement, theoretical premises, relational analysis, agent-centricity, power-centricity
Subjects:
Political science and international studies

Cite this dataset as:
Kivimaki, T., 2024. Premises of Support and Opposition to NATO Enlargement: A Dataset. Bath: University of Bath Research Data Archive. Available from: https://doi.org/10.15125/BATH-01369.

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Data

NATO Final stata 20240202.dta
application/octet-stream (35kB)
Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0

This is the Stata 17 datasets of a data package in which the focus is on the arguments presented by 40 leading analysts of European security in their arguments for their view on whether NATO enlargement was a mistake. The selection of the experts was done by the Foreign Affairs journal that published an opinion survey of 62 experts of which 40 published their arguments in addition to their opinions in this survey publication of Foreign Affairs (Foreign Affairs Survey 2022).

Review of premises … R1.6).nvp
application/x-dbt (22MB)
Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0

In this NVivo 12 textual analysis package file the focus is on the arguments presented by 40 leading analysts of European security in their arguments for their view on whether NATO enlargement was a mistake. These arguments by 40 of the 62 surveyed experts is the textual material of this dataset. The textual data was coded to reveal premises of these experts.

Code

Codebook 20240202 .docx
application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document (27kB)
Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0

This is the codebook related to the dataset. It explains the nature of the data, the coding rules, and the variables. It also instructs about the sources of the data and instructs on the use and referencing to this data.

Creators

Timo Kivimaki
University of Bath

Contributors

University of Bath
Rights Holder

Documentation

Data collection method:

The data was compiled by using NVivo 12 textual analysis package to code texts and measure levels of various theoretical premises. The quantitative results of the textual analysis were then statistically analysed by using Stata 17 program package.

Technical details and requirements:

NVivo 12 textual analysis package and Stata 17 statistical analysis package.

Funders

Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO)
https://doi.org/10.13039/501100020171

Seeking post-Cold War evidence-based prescriptions for international efforts at protecting civilians from organised violence: what kind of agent and operation combination save lives
300100

Publication details

Publication date: 5 June 2024
by: University of Bath

Version: 1

DOI: https://doi.org/10.15125/BATH-01369

URL for this record: https://researchdata.bath.ac.uk/id/eprint/1369

Related papers and books

Kivimäki, T., 2024. Theoretical Premises of Support of and Opposition to NATO Enlargement. Geopolitics, 1-33. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1080/14650045.2024.2352569.

Contact information

Please contact the Research Data Service in the first instance for all matters concerning this item.

Contact person: Timo Kivimaki

Departments:

Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences
Politics, Languages and International Studies