Dataset for "The Potential for Computational IT Tools in Disaster Relief and Shelter Design"

The expanding use of IT has brought an increase in productivity to the world of business, industry and commerce. However, this is not mirrored by an equivalent growth in the use of IT by aid agencies in post-disaster situations. This data contains results from a pioneering two-stage study which tested the appetite for the increased use of computational IT tools in this sector, their level of usefulness and whether they can be practically implemented.

The data contains the results of two separate online surveys (pre-use survey and post-use survey).

The first survey was conducted with thirty aid workers across nineteen countries on their use of IT and computational tools in shelter design and provision. The data contains information about the knowledge of the aid workers in relation to building performance situation software package and tools. The key finding was that none of the participants used any building simulation tools or software packages in any of the design stages of shelter construction and the great majority of the participants identified a need for a comprehensive, easy to use and freely available shelter design tool.

The data also contains information for the second survey which involved 48 aid-workers to record their experience of using the new tools and their feedback about the shelter design tools provided to them during the study.

Subjects:

Cite this dataset as:
Kuchai, N., 2020. Dataset for "The Potential for Computational IT Tools in Disaster Relief and Shelter Design". Bath: University of Bath Research Data Archive. Available from: https://doi.org/10.15125/BATH-00712.

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Data

Shelter Design … topic2).xlsx
application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet (281kB)
Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0

This excel files contain results of online surveys conducted with thirty aid workers across nineteen countries on their use of IT and computational tools in shelter design and provision. The key finding was that none of the participants used any building simulation tools or software packages in any of the design stages of shelter construction. This data was collected between June 2018 to December 2018

Post-use evaluation survey.xlsx
application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet (37kB)
Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0

This is the results of the second survey involving 48 aid-workers was then carried out to record their experience of using the new tools and 97% of the participants identified a need for such shelter design tools. The majority felt that the new tools were useful and that they would like to use similar tools in their work, most of them preferring tools in the form of web applications. This data was collected between February 2019 to April 2019

Creators

Contributors

David Coley
Supervisor
University of Bath

Juliana Holley
Supervisor
University of Bath

Paul Shepherd
Supervisor
University of Bath

Alexander Copping
Supervisor
University of Bath

University of Bath
Rights Holder

Coverage

Collection date(s):

From 1 June 2018 to 30 April 2019

Documentation

Data collection method:

Google Forms were used as the data collection instrument. Online surveying was adopted because the participants were in various countries. The first the survey contained 50 questions, the second eight.

Funders

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)
https://doi.org/10.13039/501100000266

Healthy Housing for the Displaced
EP/P029175/1

Publication details

Publication date: 17 November 2020
by: University of Bath

Version: 1

DOI: https://doi.org/10.15125/BATH-00712

URL for this record: https://researchdata.bath.ac.uk/id/eprint/712

Related articles

Kuchai, N., Shepherd, P., Calabria-Holley, J., Copping, A., Matard, A. and Coley, D., 2020. The potential for computational IT tools in disaster relief and shelter design. Journal of International Humanitarian Action, 5(1). Available from: https://doi.org/10.1186/s41018-020-00069-1.

Contact information

Please contact the Research Data Service in the first instance for all matters concerning this item.

Contact person: Noorullah Kuchai

Departments:

Faculty of Engineering & Design
Architecture & Civil Engineering

Research Centres & Institutes
Centre for Doctoral Training in Decarbonisation of the Built Environment (dCarb)
Centre for Energy and the Design of Environments (EDEn)