Dataset for "Lipid metabolism links nutrient-exercise timing to insulin sensitivity in overweight men"

Dataset for "Lipid metabolism links nutrient-exercise timing to insulin sensitivity in overweight men"

The aim of the present work was to assess the acute and chronic effects of manipulating nutrient-exercise timing on lipid metabolism, skeletal muscle adaptation, and oral glucose insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese men. This project comprised two experiments. We first assessed the acute metabolic and mRNA responses to manipulating nutrient-exercise timing (Acute Study), followed by a 6-week randomized controlled trial to assess the longer-term adaptations in response to nutrient-exercise timing (Training Study). We showed that in overweight/obese, but otherwise healthy men (mean±SD for age: 30 ± 10 years for acute study, 35 ± 9 years for training study and BMI: 30.2±3.5 kg/m-2 for acute study, 30.9±4.5 kg/m-2 for training study) a single exercise bout before versus after nutrient provision increased lipid utilization at the whole-body level, but also in both type I (p<0.01) and type II muscle fibers (p=0.02). We then used a 6-week intervention to show sustained, 2-fold increases in lipid utilization with exercise training before versus after nutrient provision (p<0.01). An oral glucose-derived estimate of peripheral insulin sensitivity (OGIS index) increased when training was performed before versus after nutrient provision (25±38 vs -21±32 mL/min/m-2; p=0.01) and this was associated with increased lipid utilization during exercise (r=0.50, p=0.02). Regular exercise prior to nutrient provision augmented remodelling of skeletal muscle phospholipids and muscle expression of the glucose transport protein GLUT4 (p<0.05). These responses were observed despite similar changes in body mass, waist-to-hip ratio, and oxidative capacity. Therefore: 1) experiments investigating exercise training and metabolic health need to control for nutrient-exercise timing; 2) exercise performed before versus after nutrient intake may exert beneficial effects on lipid utilization and oral glucose insulin sensitivity.

Subjects:
Biomolecules and biochemistry

Cite this dataset as:
Edinburgh, R., Bradley, H., Abdullah, N., Robinson, S., Chrzanowski-Smith, O., Walhin, J., Joanisse, S., Manolopoulos, K., Philp, A., Hengist, A., Chabowski, A., Brodsky, F., Koumanov, F., Betts, J., Thompson, D., Wallis, G., Gonzalez, J., 2019. Dataset for "Lipid metabolism links nutrient-exercise timing to insulin sensitivity in overweight men". Bath: University of Bath Research Data Archive. Available from: https://doi.org/10.15125/BATH-00672.

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Data

Data.xlsx
application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet (108kB)
Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0

Supplementary (individual participant) data are included in this data set for reported outcome measures.

Creators

Rob Edinburgh
University of Bath

Helen Bradley
University of Birmingham

Nurul Abdullah
University of Birmingham

Scott Robinson
University of Birmingham

Oliver Chrzanowski-Smith
University of Bath

Jean-Philippe Walhin
University of Bath

Sophie Joanisse
University of Birmingham

Konstantinos Manolopoulos
University of Birmingham

Andrew Philp
Garvan Institute of Medical Research

Aaron Hengist
University of Bath

Adrian Chabowski
Medical University of Bialystok

Frances Brodsky
University College London

James Betts
University of Bath

Dylan Thompson
University of Bath

Gareth Wallis
University of Birmingham

Javier Gonzalez
University of Bath

Documentation

Data collection method:

Supplementary (individual participant) data are included in this data set for reported outcome measures. Detailed data collection methods are included in the documentation (readme) file.

Documentation Files

Read_me_file_for_archive.docx
application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document (24kB)
Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0

This document contains information regarding the methods used to collect the data provided in the excel data sheet.

Supplementary_M ... and_Tables.docx
application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document (34kB)
Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0

Funders

Can Exercise in the Fasted State Unlock Metabolic Health Benefits for Overweight and Obese Individuals

Allen Foundation (Allen Foundation Inc.)
https://doi.org/10.13039/100008796

Medical Research Council (MRC)
https://doi.org/10.13039/501100000265

Role of Rab3 in Peripheral Tissue Insulin Resistance
MR/P002927/1

Medical Research Council (MRC)
https://doi.org/10.13039/501100000265

Regulation of Human Glucose Homeostasis by the Novel CHC22 Clathrin Isoform
MR/S008144/1

Rank Prize Funds

Fellowship for Javier Gonzalez - Understanding the Influence of Pre-Exercise Nutrition on PostPrandial Carbohydrate Metabolism and Energy Balance

Publication details

Publication date: 19 October 2019
by: University of Bath

Version: 1

DOI: https://doi.org/10.15125/BATH-00672

URL for this record: https://researchdata.bath.ac.uk/id/eprint/672

Related articles

Edinburgh, R M, Bradley, H E, Abdullah, N-F, Robinson, S L, Chrzanowski-Smith, O J, Walhin, J -P, Joanisse, S, Manolopoulos, K N, Philp, A, Hengist, A, Chabowski, A, Brodsky, F M, Koumanov, F, Betts, J A, Thompson, D, Wallis, G A and Gonzalez, J T, 2019. Lipid metabolism links nutrient-exercise timing to insulin sensitivity in men classified as overweight or obese. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1210/clinem/dgz104.

Contact information

Please contact the Research Data Service in the first instance for all matters concerning this item.

Contact person: Rob Edinburgh

Departments:

Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences
Health